YouthPower Action
Mozambique

Prime Implementer

FHI 360

Project Timeline

9 months

Project Goals

  • 22,000 older OVC (10-18) and their household members and youth-headed (up to 29) households caring for OVC reached with OVC services
  • 5,500 older OVC (10-18) and their household members and OVC in youth-headed households access HIV services
  • 435 savings groups (VS&Ls) in target districts with effective participation of the target beneficiary group supported
  • 300 adolescents participating in Community Dialogue activities
  • 168 community members participating in Youth Score Card activities

Brief Background

USAID Mozambique engaged YouthPower Action for a 9-month project to strengthen the capacity of families and communities to care for and protect older orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) and youth heads of households that have been affected by HIV/AIDS. This activity, built on a 5-year project, to support the Government Mozambique (GRM) and civil society partners to support this vulnerable population to access health and social services that enable them to live healthy and productive lives. YouthPower Action Mozambique used the positive youth development (PYD) approach as a means of focusing existing OVC services on the needs of adolescents. The project reached 19 PEPFAR districts in 6 of 10 provinces and was implemented through 17 civil society organizations (CSOs).

CONTEXT

  • 52% of the population is under 18
  • 8th highest HIV prevalence rate in the world
  • Adolescent girls (15-24) prevalence rate of 11.1% compared to 3.7% for men of same ages
  • 1 out of 2 girls is married before she turns 18; 1 in 9 before 15
  • 20% first sexual experience before 15; 75% before 18

Results

RESULT #1: INCREASED KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING OF ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT

  • Trained CSOs on adolescent development and positive youth development based on Development Assets Profile (DAP); CSOs trained community health workers
  • Used the DAP as an educational tool to explain importance of external and internal assets
  • Created life skills curriculum based on debates and discussion
    • Adolescent development
    • Child protection
    • GBV and gender
    • Nutrition
    • Health including SRH, drugs and alcohol, WASH
    • Stigma, discrimination, and bullying
  • Curriculum also used to guide parents/caregivers groups and community opinion leader groups to help them understand adolescence and how to communicate with and support adolescents

RESULT #2: INCREASED OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUTH TO VOICE THEIR PERSPECTIVES TO INFORM DECISIONS RELATING TO YOUTH SERVICES

  • Youth-led mapping in each district to identify youth services and update the directory of OVC support services to include programs for youth (vocational training, recreational, cultural programs, youth support services)
  • Youth planned, designed and implemented 95 health fairs involving 786 youth
  • 627 youth (ages 14-18) were integrated into Community Children’s Protection Committees, a civil society body to oversee child protection services. The project also helped the Committees understand the importance of involving youth as members
  • Adapted an existing community participatory activity to assess the quality of government services to create a Youth Score Card. Youth participated in developing the indicators and evaluating the performance of those services

RESULT #3: INCREASED NUMBER OF OLDER OVC AND YOUTH-HEADED HOUSEHOLDS THAT CARE FOR OVC THAT HAVE ACCESS TO SAVINGS AND LOANS AND FINANCIAL LITERACY

  • 14,260 beneficiaries participated in financial literacy training
  • 7,594 adolescents (14-18) and 4,889 youth heads of households participated in savings groups
  • Youth in savings groups were paired with an adult sponsor
  • Many youths used savings to support school fees creating a link to school retention

RESULT #4: INCREASED ACCESS TO COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICES THAT IMPROVE HEALTH OUTCOMES AND QUALITY OF LIFE FOR OLDER OVC AND YOUTH-HEADED HOUSEHOLDS IN COORDINATION WITH GRM AND CSOS

  • Enhanced existing Children’s Clubs to provide greater focus on adolescent life skills; more than 19,000 youth participated in the clubs
  • Implemented OVC care and support services in compliance with minimum service standards defined by GRM. Created new screening tool for adolescents
  • Provided psycho-social support
  • Promoted HIV positive pregnant adolescents and teen mothers and pregnant adolescents to participate in Mother-to-Mother groups
  • Supported school enrollment and engaged 2000 youth in study groups
  • Provided nutrition services
  • Supported for securing documentation to enhance access to services