Aside from family, teachers are often the main adults with whom young people interact on a daily basis. Ideally, as trusted gatekeepers of information, people who teach about sexual and reproductive health should function as role models, advocate for healthy school environments, and provide correct and age-appropriate information to their students. In many schools, however, reproductive health education for young people consists of didactic lectures about basic anatomy and physiology. This is hardly surprising, because most training programs fail to prepare future teachers to teach the subject effectively. As a result, many teachers complete their training with critical gaps in their own knowledge of sexual and reproductive health. Some have judgmental attitudes or religious or moral objections to teaching young people about sex, contraception, or condom use. Others simply feel uncomfortable talking about these subjects or using the interactive teaching methods that are most effective in promoting healthy sexual behavior.
 
Those best suited to teach young people about sexual and reproductive health should have a commitment to working with youth and teaching this material, have a healthy attitude about their own sexuality, be approachable, have good communication skills, be nonjudgmental, respect others' confidential information, demonstrate competence and knowledge in the subject matter, be willing to use interactive teaching methods, and have access to training and support.


International Technical Guidance on Sexuality Education Volume 1

These technical guidance documents seek to assist education, health, and other relevant authorities to develop and implement school-based sexuality education materials and programs. Based on a rigorous review of the evidence up to the date of publication, Volume 1 focuses on the rationale for comprehensive sexuality education (2010).


International Technical Guidance on Sexuality Education Volume 2

These technical guidance documents seek to assist education, health, and other relevant authorities to develop and implement school-based sexuality education materials and programs. Based on a rigorous review of the evidence up to the date of publication, Volume 2 focuses the topics and learning objectives that should be covered in a ‘basic minimum package’ on sexuality education for children and young people (2010).


It’s All One Curriculum: Guidelines and Activities for a Unified Approach to Sexuality, Gender, HIV, and Human Rights Education

This curriculum provides a rationale, content, and sample activities for placing gender and rights at the center of sexuality and HIV curricula—both as stand-alone modules and integrated with topics such as relationships, puberty, and condom use. The two-set book is user-friendly and designed to be used flexibly, so that educators in diverse settings can easily understand the content and extract the level of detail they need to meet local goals. It is available in Spanish, French, Bangla, and Chinese, and is being adapted and translated into Arabic (2009).


Tools for Educators

This series of resources, developed by Planned Parenthood, aims to provide guidance to educators in implementing and evaluating sex education. While primarily directed to the United States, the resources are relevant to educators in a wide variety of settings.


Health and Family Life Education Teacher Training Manual:  Self and Interpersonal Relationships Theme Unit and Sexuality and Sexual Health Theme Unit

The purpose of this manual is to provide trainers in the Caribbean with materials and resources to conduct in-country teacher-training on two themes in the Health and Family Life Education (HFLE) Common Curriculum: self and interpersonal relationships, and sexuality and sexual health. The lessons' content addresses many health and social challenges in the region, including HIV/AIDS, violence, and substance abuse (2009).